Popcorn Shower
Popcorn Shower
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dtybywl:

Turbo Island – More Great Tees / Test Pressing
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(via Communism in textiles: Soviet fabrics from the 20’s and 30’s | Dangerous Minds)
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i12bent:

Gertrude Greene (May 24, 1904 - 1956): Construction 1946, 1946 - oil on wood and fiberboard (Smithsonian)
"A political leftist and social activist, Gertrude Greene avoided overt commentary in her art. Unlike Louis Schanker, Hananiah Harari, and others for whom art expressed societal concerns, natural forms, and structures, Greene looked to the purity of Mondrian and Russian Constructivists Antoine Pevsner, Naum Gabo, and Vladimir Tatlin for her artistic foundations.
Greene, especially, became fascinated with the Constructivists, ideas about unifying art and politics—thoughts that grew out of their belief that when “purified,” art would show the way for reordering society along higher planes. Even more than the theory, however, Greene was impressed with Pevsner’s and Gabo’s art, and began doing Constructivist drawings.
In her last constructions, such as Construction 1946, Greene began adding gestural areas of color. Although among her strongest and most original accomplishments, she put aside her relief constructions in favor of painting. Initially geometric, her paintings by the early 1950s became increasingly expressionistic. Her solo exhibitions, in 1951 and 1955, the first of her career, included only the late, gestural canvases.
In 1937, when the American Abstract Artists was formed, Greene was its first paid employee. She tended the desk at the Squibb Gallery exhibition in 1937, passing out questionnaires and answering the queries and jibes about the art that was featured in the first annual show. Her own work was also shown that year in the opening exhibition of the Museum of Non-Objective Painting.
Although she resigned her membership in the American Abstract Artists in 1942, only five years after the first exhibition, Greene did so in the belief that the group’s mission had been largely accomplished. She had figured prominently in the group’s programs and in promoting the purist point of view in arguments over the role of nature versus geometric purity in abstract art.” - Virginia M. Mecklenburg. The Patricia and Phillip Frost Collection: American Abstraction 1930–1945 (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press for the National Museum of American Art, 1989). 
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(via Twitter / TylerGreenDC: A 1946 (!) abstract …)
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(via » Frances Stark at Marc Foxx)
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(via https://twitter.com/despens/status/482897405281832960)
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koriblr:

xen0phile:

inexplicable poster from Thailand

Free sex, become poor dog. *Michael Jackson*